BIOGRAPHY OF MICHAEL JACKSON

 

 

1966–1980: Early life and career

 

Michael Jackson was born in Gary, Indiana. He is the second-youngest brother of seven and the eighth of ten children of Joseph and Katherine Jackson. In 1966, after taking co-lead singing duties with brother Jermaine, the group’s name changed from The Jackson Brothers to The Jackson 5. The group played at local clubs and bars, building up a following and eventually signing a contract with Motown Records in 1968. The group hit stardom, with their first four singles which charted at number-one on the Billboard Hot 100. As a solo artist, Jackson released Got to Be There in 1971 and Ben in 1972. These were released as part of the Jackson 5 franchise and produced successful singles such as “Got to Be There”, “Ben”, and a remake of Bobby Day’s “Rockin’ Robin”.

 

The group’s sales declined after 1973, and the group chafed under Motown’s strict refusal to allow the Jacksons creative control or input. In 1976, the group signed a new contract with CBS Records (first joining the Philadelphia International division and then Epic Records). When this became apparent to Motown Records, they sued the group for breach of contract.

 

As a result of the legal proceedings, which were complicated further by the fact that Jermaine Jackson was married to the daughter of Motown president (Berry Gordy), the Jacksons lost the rights to use the “Jackson 5” name and logo and also Jermaine, who wanted to stay at Motown. They changed their name to “The Jacksons”, featuring youngest brother Randy in Jermaine’s place, and continued their successful career, touring internationally and releasing six more albums between 1976 and 1984, with Jermaine eventually re-joining in 1983, making them a sextet.

 

In 1978, Jackson starred as the scarecrow in The Wiz with former-label mate Diana Ross playing Dorothy. The songs for the musical were arranged by Quincy Jones, who established a partnership with Jackson during the film’s production and agreed to produce his first solo album in four years. Off the Wall, released in 1979, was a worldwide hit, and became the first album in history to spawn four top-ten hits, including “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough” and “Rock With You”.

 

In January 1980, Jackson won his first awards for his solo efforts at the American Music Awards. He won “Favorite Soul/R&B Album” (for Off The Wall), “Favorite Male Soul/R&B Artist” and Favorite Soul/R&B Single (for “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough”). Later that month, he also won two Billboard Awards (for “Top Black Artist” and “Top Black Album”).

 

On February 27, 1980, Jackson won a Grammy Award for “Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male” (for “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough”).

 

 

Michael Jackson and the Thriller album cover

 

The original album cover to 1982’s Thriller

 

 

 

1982–1986: The Thriller era

 

In November 1982, the storybook for E.T.: The Extra-terrestrial was released. It included Jackson reading the story as well as one original song (“Someone in the Dark”). The album later won a Grammy for “Best Album for Children”.

 

In December 1982, Jackson released his second Epic album, Thriller, which became the best-selling album in music history. The album spawned seven hit singles, including “Billie Jean” (which was the first music video by a black artist to receive regular airplay on MTV), “Beat It” and the album’s title track which was accompanied by a revolutionary music video. The thirteen-minute “Thriller” was critically acclaimed, and massive airplay lead to it being packaged with the featurette “Making Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” on VHS, where it became the best-selling music home video ever. Thriller spent 37 weeks at number-one and remained on the Billboard album chart for 122 weeks. It was eventually certified 27x Platinum in the United States.

 

In 1983, whilst performing “Billie Jean” at the Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever concert Jackson debuted what can be regarded as his signature move: the moonwalk. In 1983, he started a sponsorship deal with Pepsi-Cola, and, as part of the deal, he agreed to star in a commercial. While filming a Pepsi commercial with his brothers in 1984, before a live audience, his hair caught on fire when a pyrotechnic effect went wrong. Jackson suffered serious burns on his scalp, which required skin grafts.

 

In February 1984, Jackson is nominated for twelve Grammy awards and wins eight, breaking the record for the most Grammy awards won in a single year. Seven were for the critically acclaimed Thriller and the other for the E.T.: The Extra-terrestrial storybook. In 1984, he also won eight American Music Awards and the “Special Award of Merit” and three MTV Video Music Awards.

 

After reuniting with his brothers, he then helped to write the Victory album. He then performed and starred in the successful Victory Tour which started on July 6, 1984 and lasted for five months.

 

In 1985, Jackson was invited to the White House and was personally thanked by then-President Ronald Reagan at a White House ceremony for donating the song “Beat It” for use in drunk driving prevention television and radio public service announcements.

 

Jackson continued his charity work in 1985 by co-writing, with Lionel Richie, the hit single “We Are the World”. The charity single helped to raise money and awareness for the famine in East Africa and was one of the first instances where Jackson was seen as a humanitarian. The song also won a Grammy Award for “Song of the Year”.

 

Controversy began when Jackson purchased shares in the ATV Music Publishing (a company which owned the rights to most of the Beatles’ songs), making himself the majority shareholder. This move angered close friend and songwriter Paul McCartney, who had also made a bid for the company. Ironically, it was McCartney who advised Jackson on the merits of song ownership. Their creative co-writing ended after this event. Following this controversial business deal, tabloid stories of Jackson sleeping in a hyperbaric oxygen chamber to stall the aging-process, and an allegation claiming Jackson attempted to purchase the bones of the Elephant Man inspired the pejorative nickname “Wacko Jacko”. The name “Wacko Jacko” would come to be detested by Jackson.

 

In 1986, Jackson starred in the George Lucas-produced, Francis Ford Coppola-directed 3-D film Captain EO. The film lasted 17 minutes but had costs estimated at $17 million. At the time, it was the most expensive film ever produced on a per-minute basis. In the USA, the Disney theme parks hosted Captain EO. Disneyland featured the film in tomorrow-land from September 18, 1986 until April 7, 1997. It was also featured in Walt Disney World in Epcot from September 12, 1986 until July 6, 1994.

 

 

Michael Jackson callendar 2002

 

 

 

Supported  by
MICHAEL JACKSON MANIA 

JL Taman Bendungan Asahan 5 Jakarta Indonesia 102010

phone : 62(021) 70081995 – 5703646

mobile phone : 085692114641 

https://michaeljacksonmania.wordpress.com/

 

 

 

 Editor in Chief :

AUDI YUDHASMARA

email : audiyudhasmara@yahoo.com

 

 

Copyright © 2009, Michael Jackson Mania  Information Network. All rights reserved.

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